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Fulfilling Desires

The Spatial Problems of Disney Princesses and Why Their Husbands-To-Be Are So Much Better Off

In 2013 Disney released its 53rd animated movie Frozen. (Very) loosely based on Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale “The Snow Queen”, it tells the story of two sisters, one of which, Elsa, has the power to manipulate ice. Instead of making her the real villain of the film, Disney opted for a misunderstood and suppressed young woman, who flees her castle, which she deems a prison, when her subjects find out about her powers. Her younger sister Anna vows to bring her back and to show everyone that her “sister’s not a monster. [i]t was an accident. […] So [Anna] needs to go after her.” Frozen is the story of the re-bonding of two sisters  and Elsa even saves her kid sister eventually by showing Anna that she truly loves her and not some prince. According to Stephen Holden, it is supposed to be a story that “shakes up the hyper-romantic ‘princess’ formula that has stood Disney in good stead for decades and that has grown stale.” Holden’s review reverberates a general agreement that Frozen is finally a movie that can be truly enjoyed by both sexes and that does not promote the idea that love triumphs over anything else.

 


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